1-877-908-8222 info@rccbc.ca

Connecting Community Through “Ad Rock” Project

Overview:

Community comes together to display beauty during a time of COVID-19 uncertainty.

“People opened up, it gave them something to talk about, it made everybody cheerier, and we looked forward to seeing how it changed and grew every day. It was something that basically just brought back the kindness and involvement at a distance. It felt like normality.”

The Tyee Spit is a busy and popular recreation space in Campbell River during the summer months. It has provided extra benefits to children and adults alike since the beginning of the pandemic. Its large green spaces provided enough room for groups to gather and socially distance from one another. A group of young Sparks held their weekly meeting in a circle of little camp chairs. Families and friends celebrated birthdays. Bands held their weekly practice sessions. Boy Scouts earned a badge while doing an activity outside on the beach.

Now here’s the best part about the spit in COVID times. Since March 2020, Campbell Riverites have been secretly creating art installations there. These fairy godmothers/fathers have helped us get through these scary and frustrating times. Rocks with smiling faces displayed in the shape of daisies appeared on the grass at the end of the spit. Chalk art with encouraging words sprouted up on the asphalt trail. And then, the snake appeared. The rock snake. In July 2021 (16+ months into the pandemic) near the Tyee Clubhouse someone, no one knows who, put a few painted rocks in a line on the grass with a sign nearby stating

Hi Friends!

I need your help to grow.

Add a painted rock to the end

Let’s see how far I’ll go.

#CRRockSnake

“It was a bright sight of positivity,” said Marion Franklin, who along with her mother, is a spit regular. “In this long stretch of worry and wondering when it will end, an uplifting simple effort was appreciated and hopeful.”

It didn’t take long for the ad hoc art installation to grow. There was no theme or regulation rock sizes. Flora and fauna, tv and video game characters, words of hope and thanks, superheroes and colourful mandalas adorned the ever growing row of stones.

“Some were very elaborate and some very simple,” said Franklin.

“There was a lot talent there,” said Sandy Green, with her dog Diesel, is another spit regular. “Everybody got involved in it. It didn’t matter their age or skill level.”

She said her 7-year-old granddaughter spent a couple of days painting rocks to add to the snake. And she met a tourist who also decided to contribute her talents.

“I asked her if she saw the new rock that had been added, it was a beautiful summer scene with intricate flowers,” said Green. “And it turned out she had painted it. It made her feel so welcome to Campbell River.”

Green added the Rock Snake was a topic of daily conversation.

“People opened up, it gave them something to talk about,” she said. “It made everybody cheerier, and we looked forward to seeing how it changed and grew every day. It was something that basically just brought back the kindness and involvement at a distance. It felt like normality.”

There was one rock the spit users did not like. It was created by a local real estate company. Yes, it said “We love CR.” But their logo was also prominently displayed. And that was not acceptable. This wasn’t the place for commercialism. This was about community.

“It was in poor taste,” Green said.

The snake continued to grow several meters. Some rocks went missing, snuck into an art lover’s pocket to take home. But the holes left behind were quickly filled again.

“I was happy to see that people were keen to keep it going,” said Franklin.

Sadly, the Rock Snake did come to an end. After the summer heat gave way to cooler fall days and the grass finally grew up around the rocks, a city parks staff member removed them so he could mow the lawn.

But who knows what will turn up next? Certainly, the Rock Snake will inspire someone to create a new project for the community to enjoy and share in its optimism.

How Did this Information Help?

The Tyee Spit is a busy and popular recreation space in Campbell River during the summer months. It has provided extra benefits to children and adults alike since the beginning of the pandemic. Its large green spaces provided enough room for groups to gather and socially distance from one another. A group of young Sparks held their weekly meeting in a circle of little camp chairs. Families and friends celebrated birthdays. Bands held their weekly practice sessions. Boy Scouts earned a badge while doing an activity outside on the beach.

Now here’s the best part about the spit in COVID times. Since March 2020, Campbell Riverites have been secretly creating art installations there. These fairy godmothers/fathers have helped us get through these scary and frustrating times. Rocks with smiling faces displayed in the shape of daisies appeared on the grass at the end of the spit. Chalk art with encouraging words sprouted up on the asphalt trail. And then, the snake appeared. The rock snake. In July 2021 (16+ months into the pandemic) near the Tyee Clubhouse someone, no one knows who, put a few painted rocks in a line on the grass with a sign nearby stating

Hi Friends!

I need your help to grow.

Add a painted rock to the end

Let’s see how far I’ll go.

#CRRockSnake

“It was a bright sight of positivity,” said Marion Franklin, who along with her mother, is a spit regular. “In this long stretch of worry and wondering when it will end, an uplifting simple effort was appreciated and hopeful.”

It didn’t take long for the ad hoc art installation to grow. There was no theme or regulation rock sizes. Flora and fauna, tv and video game characters, words of hope and thanks, superheroes and colourful mandalas adorned the ever growing row of stones.

“Some were very elaborate and some very simple,” said Franklin.

“There was a lot talent there,” said Sandy Green, with her dog Diesel, is another spit regular. “Everybody got involved in it. It didn’t matter their age or skill level.”

She said her 7-year-old granddaughter spent a couple of days painting rocks to add to the snake. And she met a tourist who also decided to contribute her talents.

“I asked her if she saw the new rock that had been added, it was a beautiful summer scene with intricate flowers,” said Green. “And it turned out she had painted it. It made her feel so welcome to Campbell River.”

Green added the Rock Snake was a topic of daily conversation.

“People opened up, it gave them something to talk about,” she said. “It made everybody cheerier, and we looked forward to seeing how it changed and grew every day. It was something that basically just brought back the kindness and involvement at a distance. It felt like normality.”

There was one rock the spit users did not like. It was created by a local real estate company. Yes, it said “We love CR.” But their logo was also prominently displayed. And that was not acceptable. This wasn’t the place for commercialism. This was about community.

“It was in poor taste,” Green said.

The snake continued to grow several meters. Some rocks went missing, snuck into an art lover’s pocket to take home. But the holes left behind were quickly filled again.

“I was happy to see that people were keen to keep it going,” said Franklin.

Sadly, the Rock Snake did come to an end. After the summer heat gave way to cooler fall days and the grass finally grew up around the rocks, a city parks staff member removed them so he could mow the lawn.

But who knows what will turn up next? Certainly, the Rock Snake will inspire someone to create a new project for the community to enjoy and share in its optimism.

 

Contact(s):

Robyn Ellsworth

Phone:

Community:

Campbell River

Weblink(s):

RCCbc GENERAL CONTACT

Address

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Vancouver, BC. V6J 1X1

Phone

T: 604-738-8222
Toll Free: 1-877-908-8222
F: 604-738-8218

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tdeleeuw@rccbc.ca

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